The Secret to Making the Impossible Possible

Zig Ziglar said, “Positive thinking will not let you do anything, but it will let you do everything better than negative thinking will.” Although I appreciate the intent behind his words, I respectfully disagree. Personally I know that anything is possible, because I have done things that others would say are impossible.

In high school I was a part of a football team that won the state championship three out of the four years I attended. My senior year we played a team that beat us during the season that same year and the year before, but when we walked out onto the field one last time together we were a different team than they had faced before. We were at the end of an otherwise impeccable season and our positive momentum was so strong there was no way we were going to lose that game.

It really was quite a shock to the other team when we won. They were not ready for us, totally focused on the past results and just expecting to walk all over us, even though both of their wins against us ended with merely two and three point margins between scores. We came out expecting to win too, but the difference is we knew who we were up against and acknowledged that we were facing a real opponent.

making the impossible possible

The Secret

So, what is the secret to making the impossible possible? What did we do differently the last time we played our rivals? The secret is we knew that it would be difficult, so the first step is to recognize that your journey will not be easy, that you will have setbacks along the way.

Second, we kept our strategy versatile, meaning that the second step is to stay flexible, knowing that you are going to fail over and over again before you succeed, but you have to stay determined, dedicating yourself to making your dreams a reality, which is step three. We devoted ourselves to being the state champions and made this dream a reality be sheer will.

Throughout middle school the class I played with lost most of our games, winning only one our eighth grade year I think, but when we hit high school something shifted inside of us and although we were playing the same teams we were now blowing them out with scores of 50 to 0. This is not an exaggeration.

What changed? Our mindsets. Which is the fourth and final step of creating the impossible: believing that you can. We were out there facing the same opponents and within no more a years time we had become Knights, which was our mascot, instead of Squires. In the movie Kingdom of Heaven the Patriarch of Jerusalem asks Balian of Ibelin,” Does making a man a knight make him a better fighter?” to which he answers concisely, “Yes.”

Creating the Impossible

Croix Sather, motivational speaker and author, did something that many people told him was impossible. He ran all the way across America, starting on the west coast and ending in New York, running 26 miles a day for 100 consecutive days. This very article was inspired by a TED Talk he gave discussing his journey and what he learned along the way. Here is the video:

Anyway, I want to finish with a bit of inspiration myself. In 1954 Roger Bannister broke the 4 minute mile, running it in three minutes and fifty nine seconds. Since then over 400 athletes have broken this same barrier. If he was the first person to do so, why has it become so much more common? Is it the advances we have made in technology and science enabling more people to push themselves to new levels of success?

Perhaps it is, but I would suggest another possibility. I think what enabled more than 400 individuals to hurdle the obstacle was the power of belief. They knew that it was possible because it had been done before, so the pep in their step—pun intended—was driven by the pathway that had been laid out by one man who made his dream a reality.

But how did Bannister do it? What drove him to be able to accomplish something that had been impossible until that very moment? His power of belief; he trained not only his body but his mind to be able to run a mile in under four minutes. It is a known fact that professional athletes utilize the power of their imaginations to visualize their success for years before they ever accomplish their goals. Bannister was among them, and he literally made the impossible possible.

Nelson Mandela said, “It always seems impossible until it’s done.”

Make it a great day everyone, and remember, nothing is impossible unless you believe that it is. Always pursue your dreams, because if you don’t, someone else will hire you to pursue theirs, to paraphrase Tony Gaskins Jr.

For more on how to create positive results in your life, check out my new book Holistic Health in the Modern Age, and learn how to make healthier decisions that lead not only to a healthier life, but a happier, more productive one.

If you gained insight from this post feel free to like it below, and feel free to share any stories of how you made the impossible possible.

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